"be unstoppable, be a force of nature."

It’s simple human nature to keep little secrets about ourselves. But what if your whole life is a secret? A lie?

The Goblet of Fire! Anyone wishing to submit themselves to the tournament need only write their name upon a piece of parchment and throw it in the flame before this hour on Thursday night. Do not do so lightly! If chosen, there’s no turning back. As from this moment, The Triwizard Tournament has begun.

'If you want to go back, I won't blame you,' he said. 'You can take the Cloak, I won't need it now.'
'Don't be stupid,' said Ron.
'We're coming,' said Hermione.

“Harry Potter.” Who’s Harry Potter?

The lake is the setting for the second task that the Triwizard competitors must face in Goblet of Fire, which is also my favourite task.  I find it satisfyingly creepy; I like the diversity of the methods employed by the competitors to breathe underwater, and I enjoyed plumbing the depths of a part of the grounds that had never been seen before.  In the original draft of Chamber of Secrets, I had Harry and Ron crash into the lake in Mr Weasley’s Ford Anglia, and meet the merpeople there for the first time. At that time I had a vague notion that the lake might lead to other places, and that the merpeople might play a larger role in the later books than they did, so I thought that Harry ought to be introduced to both at this stage. However, the Whomping Willow provided a more satisfying, less distracting crash, and served a later purpose in Prisoner of Azkaban, too. The Great Lake (which is really a Scottish loch, apparently freshwater and landlocked) never did develop as a portal to other seas or rivers, although the appearance of the Durmstrang ship from its depths in Goblet of Fire hints at the fact that if you are travelling by an enchanted craft, you might be able to take a magical shortcut to other waterways. - J.K. Rowling

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